Voters in Canton Uri have rejected the planned construction of a second road tunnel under the Gotthard massif, a non-governmental group said.

"/> Voters in Canton Uri have rejected the planned construction of a second road tunnel under the Gotthard massif, a non-governmental group said.

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TRANSPORT

Plans for second Gotthard tunnel rejected

Voters in Canton Uri have rejected the planned construction of a second road tunnel under the Gotthard massif, a non-governmental group said.

The new tunnel would serve as an alternative route when the main one, a heavily trafficked motorway, closes down to allow for expansion work.

Currently serving as one of the major links through the Alps, the Gotthard tunnel is often clogged with holiday-makers heading south for the summer. The world’s longest rail tunnel will soon run close by, and is scheduled to open to traffic in 2017.

The outcome of the vote was hailed as a victory by the Alpine Initiative and other environmental organisations that aim to reduce road traffic in the mountains.

The groups said in a statement that train shuttles could be considered as an alternative to the second tunnel. 

ZURICH

Swiss rail to close ticket counters in Zurich, Bern, Vaud, Ticino and Zug

Switzerland’s Federal Railways (SBB) will be removing the ticket counter from nine stations in the cantons of Zurich, Vaud, Bern, Zug and Ticino

Swiss rail to close ticket counters in Zurich, Bern, Vaud, Ticino and Zug

The SBB made the announcement on Wednesday, saying the decision was made due to a lack of demand. 

Instead, commuters will need to buy tickets from automated machines. 

In the canton of Zurich, the ticket stations in Dietlikon, Hinwil, Kloten, Männedorf and Oberwinterthur will be closed. 

In neighbouring Zug, Cham’s ticket counter will be closed, while the Herzogenbuchsee station in Bern will also go fully automated. 

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In Latin Switzerland, Pully in Vaud and Biasca in Ticino will see their ticket counters closed. 

The SBB told Swiss news outlet Watson that approximately 95 percent of ticket sales are now made via self-service machines or online. 

The advent of navigation apps has meant the need for personal advice on directions and travel has fallen, particularly in smaller areas or stations with lower traffic. 

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