Switzerland's spell of sizzling weather seems to have left Alpine cattle a bit hot under their cowbell collars. For the second time in a couple of weeks, hikers in Canton Graubünden have been attacked by cows nursing newborn calves.

"/> Switzerland's spell of sizzling weather seems to have left Alpine cattle a bit hot under their cowbell collars. For the second time in a couple of weeks, hikers in Canton Graubünden have been attacked by cows nursing newborn calves.

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ATTACK

Crazy cows attack Alpine hikers

Switzerland's spell of sizzling weather seems to have left Alpine cattle a bit hot under their cowbell collars. For the second time in a couple of weeks, hikers in Canton Graubünden have been attacked by cows nursing newborn calves.

These particular cows have done nothing wrong to the best of our knowledge
Brendan Gogarty (File)

In the latest incident, a cow attacked a man and two women who were hiking in the Dreibündstein region on Sunday near Chur in south-eastern Switzerland, Blick newspaper reported.

The animal first went after the man with its horns, according to police. The two women who tried to escape to get help were then also attacked and injured. Swiss air rescue services (Rega) flew the injured parties to hospital. 

Another cow who had recently calved attacked hikers on August 14th on Alp Maises. One woman was injured and a man who came to her aid was also attacked by the cow. The hiking trail leads through fenced pasture.

Bündner agricultural authorities recommend hikers, but also farmers, to stick to certain codes of conduct.

Anyone coming into contact with cattle is advised to keep a safe distance, while calves should not be touched under any circumstances. Also, dogs are to be kept on their leads except in emergencies.

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ATTACK

Brother of Marseille attacker arrested by Swiss police

Swiss police on Tuesday announced the arrest of a Tunisian couple including the brother of the assailant who fatally stabbed two young women in the French city of Marseille this month.

Brother of Marseille attacker arrested by Swiss police
The attack took place outside the main train station in Marseille. Photo: AFP
The pair, both asylum seekers, were arrested on Sunday in Chiasso, near the Italian border.
   
“The man is the brother of the presumed perpetrator of the attack in Marseille,” a statement from Swiss federal police said, referring to Ahmed Hanachi, the 29-year-old who killed two women in the French coastal city on October 1st.
   
The man currently in Swiss custody is “known to foreign police services for his links to jihadist terrorist movements,” the statement added.
   
“His role in the Marseille attack, if he had one, is not yet clear.”
 
   
Federal police spokeswoman Cathy Maret separately told AFP that, in accordance with Swiss law, the detained husband and wife are due to be repatriated to Tunisia.
   
But that process will take several weeks at minimum and could be altered if another jurisdiction requests the couple's extradition.
   
Maret earlier said that police had information indicating the couple “could represent a threat to Switzerland's domestic security”
   
They were arrested at the migrant registration centre in Chiasso in Switzerland's Italian-speaking Ticino region, Maret added.
   
A French security source close to the investigation into the Marseille attack identified the man in Swiss custody as Anouar Hanachi.
   
The source said the arrests were requested by Tunisian authorities.
   
Swiss police would not confirm the identities of either the man or woman.
   
The news comes as one of Hanachi's other brothers, Anis, was arrested Saturday night in Italy, after French authorities issued an international arrest warrant.
   
Another one of his brothers and a sister were detained in Tunisia late last week and had been questioned by anti-terror investigators there. They have since been released.
   
Tunisian security sources have said they suspect both Ahmed and Anour Hanachi of being “extremists”.
   
Their father Noureddine has told AFP that he doubted his sons in Europe had been radicalized, adding that he had not heard from either for two months.
   
The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for Hanachi's attack, but French investigators have not yet found evidence linking him to the jihadist organization.