Swiss television (SF) has decided not to broadcast a documentary about a Swissair crash that left 229 people dead in Canada in 1998 after controversial new allegations emerged that it may have been caused by a terrorist attack.

"/> Swiss television (SF) has decided not to broadcast a documentary about a Swissair crash that left 229 people dead in Canada in 1998 after controversial new allegations emerged that it may have been caused by a terrorist attack.

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CANADA

Swiss TV won’t broadcast Swissair crash film

Swiss television (SF) has decided not to broadcast a documentary about a Swissair crash that left 229 people dead in Canada in 1998 after controversial new allegations emerged that it may have been caused by a terrorist attack.

Swiss TV won't broadcast Swissair crash film
CBC Screenshot

SF co-researched and funded the documentary with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), which puts forward the theory that the Swissair SR-111 crash in the Atlantic Ocean near Halifax, Nova Scotia, on September 2nd 1998 was not the result of a burnt cable, but was deliberate.

Swiss journalist Fritz Muri carried out extensive research working closely with the Canadian broadcaster, according to Blick newspaper.

All 229 passengers and crew died in the tragic plane crash, including a Saudi prince and a relative of the late Shah of Iran.

A four-year official investigation carried out by the Transportation Safety Board (TSB) of Canada, which cost US$39 million found that the crash was probably caused by an electrical fault that ignited the insulation on board. 

However, the CBC documentary suggests a terrorist attack was to blame and that investigators tried to cover this up.

The Swissair 111 plane took off from New York and was heading to Geneva when it got into trouble on Canada’s eastern coast and smoke appeared in the cockpit.

In the cargo hold was half a billion dollars worth of gold, diamonds and cash, according to CBC. It is not clear what happened to the stash.

“Swissair 111: the untold story“ will be broadcast by the investigative programme The Fifth Estate on CBC at 9pm ADT (Atlantic Daylight Time) on Friday.

Presenting the new allegations on the CBC homepage, The Fifth Estate says: “Years later, the crash of Swissair 111 in 1998 remains one of Canada’s greatest tragedies. Now new disturbing information raises questions about the official cause of the disaster.“

When questioned by Blick newspaper about SF’s reasons for not broadcasting the documentary it helped to produce, SF editor-in-chief Diego Yanez said:

“Previous research results do not justify broadcasting at this moment in time. It is not our task to spread speculation.“

Yanez confirmed that SF would broadcast the film only when they have conducted their own research into the new evidence.

Swiss viewers have complained in online forums that they should be allowed to watch the programme that was co-funded by the TV licence fee they paid.

However, the documentary will still be available to watch from Switzerland via the internet on CBC online from 4am on Saturday after it has been broadcast on CBC television.

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NORWAY

WTO sides with EU over seal products ban

The Geneva-based World Trade Organization on Monday ruled in favour of the European Union in a bitter battle with Canada and Norway over its ban on the import and sale of seal products.

WTO sides with EU over seal products ban
Pamela Anderson joined in the campaign against the seal fur trade. Photo: PETA

The WTO said that while its disputes panel found merit in the countries' complaint lodged against the EU, that was outweighed by the 2010 ban that "fulfills the objective of addressing EU public moral concerns on seal welfare to a certain extent".
   
Canada said it would appeal the decision, while critics warned that the moral grounds defence justifying the EU ban could be widely applied to all sorts of products.
   
"Canada remains steadfast in its position that the seal harvest is a humane, sustainable and well-regulated activity," the Canadian government said in a statement.

"Any views to the contrary are based on myths and misinformation, and the Panel's findings should be of concern to all WTO members."

The European Union had argued that scientific evidence backed its claims that slaughter methods, such as using a club with a metal spike on it to stun seals before killing them, were cruel.
   
It also underlined that the EU public was overwhelmingly in favour of the ban.
   
Canada and Norway kill tens of thousands of seals per year, and say hunting is an age-old method allowing Atlantic fishing communities to earn an income, as well as to manage fish stocks and thereby the environment.
   
They insist their seal-hunting methods are humane and provided counter-arguments to the WTO from scientists. They said the methods were no worse than those used in commercial deer-hunting which is widespread in the EU.
   
They also called the ban trade discriminatory because seal products from EU members Sweden and Finland enjoyed unimpeded market access within the bloc.

The EU rejected that argument.
   
Canada's indigenous Inuits, who have traditionally hunted seal for centuries, are exempt from the ban.

But Inuit say it has collapsed the market for their seal products too.
   
Canadian Inuit leader Terry Audla said the EU ban showed a "fundamental lack of understanding of Arctic peoples" and called the WTO's decision "truly inexplicable".
   
A seal processing plant boss in Canada's Newfoundland, Dion Dakins, said the ban threatened the livelihood of people in Canada's coastal communities.
   
"Where do we draw the line on right versus wrong or good versus bad when it comes to the products of living resources?" he asked.
   
Animal rights groups, though, say seal hunting is a barbaric ritual and have waged a robust campaign in recent years to stop it.
   
The Brigitte Bardot Foundation, set up by the French film star turned animal rights campaigner, hailed the ruling.
   
"The WTO has taken an historic decision by recognizing that animal welfare is a moral public concern that can justify trade restrictions," it said in a statement.

Canadian actress Pamela Anderson, a member of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA),  earlier joined the campaign to back the EU ban.

"Canada has tried every trick in the book to get around the EU's ban, but we're hopeful that today's WTO decision will be the final nail in the coffin of what even Russian President Vladimir Putin has called 'a bloody business that should have been banned long ago'," PETA spokesman Ben Williamson said.

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