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NAZI

Swiss return Nazi-looted goblet

Switzerland announced on Thursday the return of a 17th century silver goblet to the estate of its Jewish owner, 75 years after its purchase at auction in Nazi-era Berlin.

The Swiss National Museum said a probe into its origins found the “Lerber Lerche” goblet was bought in 1937 at a sale of items belonging to German-American collector Emma Budge and held months after her death.

The proceeds from the auction went to a bank account blocked by the Nazis, preventing the owners from benefiting.

“Research by the MNS and the Bureau on Looted Art, together with a representative of the executor of Emma Budge’s estate, allowed us to clarify the precise circumstances of the acquisition,” said a statement from the Federal Office of Culture.

It said the goblet, which features a lark, was being returned in line with an international accord on Nazi-looted art.

Under a 1998 agreement known as the Washington Principles, 44 countries pledged to identify Nazi-confiscated art in museum collections and attempt to return the works to their rightful owners.

Budge (1852-1937) lived in Hamburg and the United States with her banker husband Henry.

Her private collection, including paintings, furniture and porcelain, is reportedly one of the largest auctioned during the Nazi era.

ART

Art project shows the scope of Switzerland’s extraordinary glacier loss

An art project has shed light on the sheer scope of Switzerland’s glacier loss in recent years due to climate change.

Art project shows the scope of Switzerland’s extraordinary glacier loss
Photo: Studio Oefner/ETH Zurich

The project looks to “visualise 140 years of glacial retreat through an interactive network”. 

READ: Swiss glaciers shrink ten percent in five years 

The project is led by Swiss artist Fabian Oefner, who has reproduced the receding glaciers using neon lines which contrast with images of the glaciers as they currently stand. 

In a collaboration with with Federal Institute of Technology Zurich and Google mapped the shrinking glaciers over time. 

READ: Swiss 'glacier initiative' collects 120,000 signatures 

“Im interested in the concept of time and how change shapes the way we see reality”, Oefner says. 

Using drones equipped with LEDs, Oefner used real representations of glacial loss as the frame for the project. 

“I looked at maps where you could see the glacier in its current state and dozens of lines drawn on the map in front of it. Each of these lines represented where the glacier was in the past few decades,” Oefner said. 

“I wanted to find a way to transport the scientific data and bring it into reality”. 

 

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