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Son of Nestlé exec charged for nude videos

The son of an American executive at Nestlé in Switzerland faces felony charges in the US for secretly filming women in the Lake Geneva region and uploading the video to a porn site, according to media reports.

Son of Nestlé exec charged for nude videos
Photo: Radnor Township Police

The 19-year-old student at Villanova University in Philadelphia, identified as T.J., placed his iPhone in a bathroom to record the women undressing.

A friend of one of the victims alerted her after seeing the video online, NBCNews.com reported.

US police said the video shows the woman undressing with her bare breasts exposed.

The young man admitted to police that he secretly hid his iPhone in the bathroom of his parents’ home, where he filmed guests as they undressed.

He later uploaded the images to the porn site from his dormitory room at university.

During the police investigation two other victims were discovered, including a woman who was 17 years old at the time of the recording.

The videos were taken while T.J. was spending holidays at his parents’ home in Tour-de-Peilz in the canton of Vaud, 20 Minutes reported online.

The newspaper identified him as as the son of a Nestlé executive who is set to move away from Switzerland.

Citing a neighbour, 20 Minutes said he attended a private bilingual school near Vevey, where he wore a uniform.

He obtained his high school matriculation (bac) before leaving Switzerland to attend university in the US.

T.J. has taken a six-month leave of absence from the university after posting bail following his arrest last week.

He is charged with dissemination and possession of child pornography, invasion of privacy, obscene materials on the internet and criminal use of a communication facility.

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NESTLE

‘Unlimited resources’: Switzerland’s Nestle goes vegan

Swiss food giant Nestle, which has made billions with dairy products, said Monday it will host start-ups that want to develop vegetarian alternatives.

'Unlimited resources': Switzerland's Nestle goes vegan
Photo: SEBASTIEN BOZON / AFP

Nestle could thus find itself at the forefront of a sector that has strong growth potential, an analyst commented.

It plans to open its research and development (R&D) centre in Konolfingen, Switzerland to “start-ups, students and scientists” a statement said.

In addition to testing sustainable dairy products, the group plans to encourage work on plant-based dairy alternatives, it added.

Chief executive Mark Schneider was quoted as saying that “innovation in milk products and plant-based dairy alternatives is core to Nestle's portfolio strategy.”

The group unveiled a vegetable-based milk that had already been developed with the process, and technical director Stefan Palzer told AFP it planned to focus on 100-200 such projects a year.

Jon Cox, an analyst at Kepler Cheuvreux, noted that while Nestle had missed some consumer trends in the past, it has now “taken something of a lead in the plant-based alternative market for food”.

And “given its pretty much unlimited resources, Nestle is going to come out one of the winners in the space,” Cox forecast in an e-mail.

Nestle said that “internal, external and mixed teams” would work at the R&D centre over six-month periods.

Nestle would provide “expertise and key equipment such as small to medium-scale production equipment to facilitate the rapid upscaling of products for a test launch in a retail environment,” it added.

The Swiss food giant has long been known for its dairy products, but faced a boycott in the 1970s for allegedly discouraging mothers in developing countries from breastfeeding even though it was cheaper and more nutritious than powdered formula.

On Monday, the group's statement also underscored that the research initiative was part of its commitment to help fight global warming.

“As a company, we have set ambitious climate goals. This is part of our promise to develop products that are good for you and good for the planet,” it said.

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