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CYCLING

Peter Sagan takes Swiss tour sprint stage

Slovakian rider Peter Sagan, of the Cannondale team, won a sprint finish to take the eighth stage of the Tour of Switzerland cycling competition on Saturday with home star Mathias Frank keeping the yellow jersey.

Peter Sagan takes Swiss tour sprint stage
Fans show their support for Peter Sagan. Photo: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images/AFP

Sagan, who had also won Monday's third stage, was the strongest over the last few metres of the 180.5km run from Zernez and Bad Ragaz.

He finished ahead of Italy's Daniele Bennati and Philippe Gilbert of Belgium.

"I have to thank all my teammates for the amazing work they did to build this win," said Sagan.

"Today we knew was a great opportunity. The third category climb was the decisive point to get an orderly sprint."

"It's one step further for the Tour de France and my form is improving."

Frank has a 13-second lead over Portugal's Rui Costa and 23-second advantage over Czech rider Roman Kreuziger ahead of Sunday's concluding time trial in the village of Flumserberg.

For Sagan, it was his eighth career stage win on the race with two coming in 2011 and four last year.

One of the day's biggest losers was Australia's Cameron Meyer who was forced to stop to change a wheel.

The Orica GreenEdge rider slipped from eighth to 10th place in the overall standings with a 2 min 09 sec deficit.

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CYCLING

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021

Demand for bicycles has soared in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic, but conversely the global supply is at record low levels, with consumers having to wait months or over a year for their bike of choice.

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021
Photo: Stocksnap/Pixabay

Bikes are projected to outsell cars in Europe by two to one by 2030.   

But 2021 will not be an easy year to buy a bike in many European countries, especially if you have a particular model in mind. 

Firstly, there's been a huge surge in demand for bikes during the pandemic, as Europeans looked for ways to stay fit and move around more freely without having to worry about being exposed to Covid-19 on public transport.

On the flip side, bike production in China, which supplies almost the entire global market, has practically ground to a halt.

The same can be said for bicycle accessories and components, which are either not being produced in Chinese factories currently or held up for months in ports in Asia due to the reduction of capacity in shipping.

 

In this short report, video producer Alex Dunham explores the issue of Europe's bike shortage in 2021.

 

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