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Stabbing murder of Pole declared 'cold case'

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Stabbing murder of Pole declared 'cold case'
Investigator's issued this photo of a tattoo on the victim's body. Photo: Vaud cantonal police
10:27 CET+01:00
Just ahead of his retirement Philippe Vautier, chief prosecutor for the northern part of the canton of Vaud, has officially closed the books on an investigation into a sensational murder case — without finding a suspect.

The mysterious case dates back to October 27th 210 in the municipality of Montagny-près-Yverdon when the nude body of a Polish man was found covered in knife wounds.

The 36-year-old man, who had been visiting Switzerland as a tourist, was murdered elsewhere before his body was moved to the community near Yverdon-les-Bains.

The murder is the only “cold case” in the canton of Vaud in the past 20 years, 20 Minutes newspaper reported on Monday.

The victim’s identity was not immediately known but a ring on one of his fingers, inscribed with the name of his wife, Agnieszka, allowed investigators to identify him 24 days later.

A silversmith’s hallmark on the ring identified it as Polish made.

In Poland, an appeal was launched for information along with a photo of the victim, which resulted in the man’s widow contacting police.

The couple had a child and the widow explained that her husband had gone to Switzerland with a friend, according to police reports.

Police tracked down the friend but he was cleared of any connection to the homicide, 20 Minutes said.

The man’s identity was confirmed by through a check of dental records by forensic scientists in Lausanne at a university centre (CURML).

But without any leads and suspects the investigation wound down.

Now it has been officially filed as an unsolved case, 20 Minutes said.

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