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Average Swiss household income rises

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Average Swiss household income rises
Photo: Yoshiko Kusano/Photopress
08:06 CET+01:00
The average monthly disposable income of Swiss households exceeds 7,000 francs and annual savings amount to more than twice that amount, according to latest government figures released on Monday.

Net income averaged 7,112 francs ($7,490) in 2012, up from 6,825 francs two years previously, the federal statistics office said in a report.

It found that average families in Switzerland were able to save more than 15,800 francs a year.

The study said that work was the primary source of household income, accounting for 75 percent of gross revenue (before taxes and obligatory deductions).

Pensions, annuities and social benefits accounted for the second major source of revenue (18.4 percent) , while interest and dividends accounted for just 4.9 percent.

The statistics office said that the income is not evenly distributed with six out of ten households earning less than the average.

Housing and energy accounted for the biggest household expenditure, averaging 1,500 francs a month, almost 15 percent of gross revenues, a proportion that has remained stable since 2006, the figures showed.

Taxes accounted for around 1,200 francs a month, the largest single share of obligatory deductions that totalled 2,950 francs a month (29 percent of gross income).

These deductions include social insurance, unemployment insurance, pensions and health insurance,

Other expenditures included transport (eight percent), leisure and culture (6.4 percent), food and non-alcoholic drinks (6,3 percent) and 5.4 percent towards restaurants and hotels.

After accounting for expenses, average households were able to save 1,318 francs a month, around 13 percent of gross revenue.

But the statistics office noted that families with gross income of less than 5,000 francs a month are generally not able to save anything.

Their expenditures are often greater than their revenues.

Households of retirees accounted for a majority in this category, with many of them financing their expenses through life savings.

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