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MP hopeful aims to shock with 'nude' band

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MP hopeful aims to shock with 'nude' band
Roland Lutz — dressed for campaigning. Photo: 1siedeln.ch
09:14 CEST+02:00
There is no contradiction between playing rock music on stage in nothing but a Borat-style thong, and being a candidate for Switzerland's conservative Swiss People's Party (SVP), an aspiring politician tells The Local.

Roland Lutz is seeking election as a representative of the canton of Schwyz, where he normally presents himself in a dark suit and tie.

Lutz has received the backing of the SVP establishment, including party leader Toni Brunner who calls him “a real Swiss”, reports Zurich-based tabloid Blick, which also notes that he has the support of former federal cabinet minister and party figurehead Christoph Blocher.

But the energetic 53-year-old is facing questions in the media after photos emerged showing him wearing a giant rubber penis strapped to his loins while playing with a rock band.  

Blick this week revealed Facebook and YouTube images of the candidate in provocative poses while performing with party rock group Tyte Stone.

In a report that has been picked up by other national media, Blick noted that Lutz played electric guitar while dressed in only a thong with the attached rubber penis and testicles. Other members of the band are also shown performing virtually naked.

Blick suggested the lyrics of the songs played by the group, which appear to be sexist and otherwise designed to shock — one of them deals with having sex with marmots — were in questionable taste.


Lutz on stage with Tyte Stone. Image: tytestonebuaba/ YouTube

But Lutz, who began playing rock 35 years ago with school friends “mainly to get the girls”, and performs with the stage name Shy-Boy has told The Local on Wednesday that he doesn't see any contradiction between his music and his political aspirations.

“Why there should be?” he joked before adding: “Actually, I am conservative in many ways, but with my music I am more liberal.”

“Of course, a small number of people in the political community think I shouldn't do what I do, but most people think it's fine.”

Speaking about the unusual choice of ‘costumes used by Tyte Stone, Lutz explained that the first two thirds of the group's concerts were more traditional but the last third was “show time”.

“For the last part of our concerts, we put on elephant suits or 'Borat' costumes,” he said, referring to the revealing thongs worn by the comic creation of the UK's Sacha Baron Cohen.

“It's fun to get on stage and shock people,” he said.

The existence of a politician such as Lutz casts a different light on the SVP, frequently described as a right-wing party, which is currently leading other parties nationally in the opinion polls.

But Lutz says the controversial party is fundamentally about promoting sovereignty, a strong economy – including lower taxes – and freedom.

“We are conservative in the sense that we don't believe in new ideas that actually make things worse,” he told The Local.

On the thorny issue of migration, where the SVP has been accused of fanning resentment against foreigners, Lutz was keen to stress Switzerland's strong, two-century-old tradition of asylum.

“We also recognize that Switzerland needs skilled immigrants. But with three quarters of the world's population living under dictatorships, there are just too many people without skills or language. What have to ask ourselves what these people can do for Switzerland?

So will Lutz get in stage and perform a concert if he wins a seat in this month's elections?

“Well you never know! We'll what and see what happens”

But however it pans out on the night, the Swiss politicians has no plans to put down his guitar any time soon.   

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