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CYCLING

Cycling: Sagan doubles up at Swiss Tour

World champion Peter Sagan won his second straight stage at the Tour of Switzerland on Monday and took the leader's yellow jersey to boot.

Cycling: Sagan doubles up at Swiss Tour
Peter Sagan won the yellow jersey. Photo: TdS

Slovak Sagan made a solo break out of the leading peloton to catch two

escapees in the final 10km before outsprinting Swiss pair Michael Albasini and Silvan Dillier to win the 192.6km third stage from Grosswangen to Rheinfelden.

The peloton, including previous race leader Jurgen Roelandts, arrived three seconds back. But thanks to a time bonus for winning the stage, Sagan moved into the overall lead with a 3sec gap to Belgian Roelandts, who was fifth on the stage.

“I'm very happy, I thank my team,” said Sagan.

“It was a stressful day under the rain. Knowing the finish was on a hill I preferred to get ahead.”

The win saw Sagan increase his record of stage victories at the Tour of Switzerland to 13.

On Sunday he took sole possession of the record which he had shared with Swiss trio Ferdi Kubler and Hugo Koblet, two of whom raced in the 1950s, and Fabian Cancellara, who won Saturday's opening prologue.

The peloton that arrived behind the three leaders was greatly reduced, with the original bunch breaking up throughout the tough stage raced in wet conditions.

It meant that one of the overall race favourites, Briton Geraint Thomas, moved up into the top 10 – he now sits ninth at 19sec.

CYCLING

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021

Demand for bicycles has soared in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic, but conversely the global supply is at record low levels, with consumers having to wait months or over a year for their bike of choice.

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021
Photo: Stocksnap/Pixabay

Bikes are projected to outsell cars in Europe by two to one by 2030.   

But 2021 will not be an easy year to buy a bike in many European countries, especially if you have a particular model in mind. 

Firstly, there's been a huge surge in demand for bikes during the pandemic, as Europeans looked for ways to stay fit and move around more freely without having to worry about being exposed to Covid-19 on public transport.

On the flip side, bike production in China, which supplies almost the entire global market, has practically ground to a halt.

The same can be said for bicycle accessories and components, which are either not being produced in Chinese factories currently or held up for months in ports in Asia due to the reduction of capacity in shipping.

 

In this short report, video producer Alex Dunham explores the issue of Europe's bike shortage in 2021.

 

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