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MEDICINE

Life expectancy: Swiss set to live longer and prosper

One in four girls born in Switzerland in 2017 could live to be 100 while one in eight boys born in that year could reach the same milestone, according to data published on Thursday.

Life expectancy: Swiss set to live longer and prosper
File photo: Depositphotos

The new age modelling published by the Swiss Federal Statistics Office (FSO) highlights the increasing life expectancy of Switzerland.

Under the model, boys born in Switzerland in 2017 are projected to live an average 81.4 years. For girls, that figure is 85.4 years.

That is up from the 76.3 years for men and 82.1 years for women projected for people born in 1997.

A century of huge rises

From 1876 to 1917, Swiss life expectancy jumped from 43 to 63 for men and from 47 to 70 for women. A drop in infant mortality and deaths from infectious diseases were responsible for these increases, according to the FSO.

Life expectancy increases from 1917 to 1967 can be put down to a drop in deaths from cardiovascular diseases, especially among older people, the stats office said.

According to World Health Organization (WHO) figures from 2015, Swiss men had the longest life expectancy in the world (81.3 years for boys born in 2015) while Swiss women came sixth with a projected life expectancy of 85.3 years.

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MEDICINE

How Swiss healthcare costs have ‘doubled’ since 2000

Recently released figures show that health insurance premiums have doubled in the past 20 years, with some Swiss households spending almost one fifth of their salary on healthcare.

How Swiss healthcare costs have 'doubled' since 2000
Photo: Depositphotos

Figures from the Swiss Trade Union show that costs have increased by 120 percent on average since the year 2000. 

The increases are much higher than wages, while other cost-mitigating changes like rebates for people on lower incomes have also failed to keep up with rising premiums. 

READ MORE: How Swiss residents are 'paying too much' for medicines and health insurance premiums

 

Couples with household salaries between 60,000 and 90,000 francs spend on average 14 percent of their salaries on healthcare. 

In some of the more expensive cantons such as Bern and Zurich, the amount can be higher than 20 percent. 

While lower income Swiss will be eligible for reductions and rebates, middle-income Swiss are often hit the hardest by increases in healthcare costs. 

More going into debt to pay for healthcare

The impact of the cost increases can be seen in relation to household debt for healthcare. 

At the turn of the millennium, just over a third (36 percent) of households in Switzerland had healthcare debts higher than 5000 francs

At the present time, 59 percent of households had accrued debts of over 10,000 francs for healthcare costs. 

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