How much will you pay for Swiss health insurance premiums in 2021?

How much will you pay for Swiss health insurance premiums in 2021?
The cost of health insurance premiums for 2020 has just been released. Photo by AFP
The average premium for compulsory health insurance in Switzerland will go up by just 0.5 percent in 2021, an increase that health authorities consider ‘moderate’.

Depending on the canton, the increase will be between -1.6 percent and 2.1 percent, the Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH) announced on Tuesday.

Health Minister Alain Berset said the new rates reflect the “downward trend”, as the increase will be well below the average of 3.7 percent imposed since the mandatory insurance (LAMal) went into effect in 1994.

According to FOPH, the median premiums for adults and young people up to age 26 will go up by 0.4 percent, for a monthly payment of 375.40 francs and 265.60 francs, respectively. The average premium for children will drop slightly by 0.1 percent to 99.70.

Where will premiums be highest and lowest?

The cantons of Ticino and Jura will experience the largest hikes — 2.1 percent and 2 percent, respectively.

Premiums in Valais will increase by 1.6 percent on average, and in Lucerne, 1.4 percent.

People in Fribourg and Geneva will have to pay 0.6 percent more, and in Vaud, 0.9 percent.

On the other hand, premiums for residents of Appenzell Innerrhoden, Zurich, and Neuchâtel will actually decrease — by 1.6 percent, 0.7 percent, and 0.2 percent, respectively.

All these numbers are average and will go up or down depending on the deductible amount chosen.

It is a fixed out-of-pocket expense you pay for doctor visits and medications. Once the amount is reached, the insurance will cover 90 percent of the costs.

The deductible, called the ‘franchise’, ranges from 300 to 2,500 francs; the lower the franchise, the higher the premiums.

You can calculate your premiums for 2021 here.

READ MORE: One in five Swiss in favour of compulsory coronavirus vaccination 

How are premiums determined each year?

They are calculated by the insurers but must be approved by FOPH.

“Premiums are only approved if they comply with the statutory requirements and cover costs. Premiums must not, however, exceed costs by a disproportionate amount or give rise to excessive reserves”, FOPH said. 

“Excessive reserves” are not allowed because insurance companies are not permitted to profit from the compulsory insurance.

They can, however, make profit from optional supplemental insurance plans that offer additional services not covered by basic insurance, such as alternative medicine treatments.
 


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