SHARE
COPY LINK
For members

COST OF LIVING

Petrol to top CHF2 per litre in several Swiss cantons

Petrol prices in Switzerland are set to rise to heights not seen for well over a decade, with fuel to cost more than CHF2 per litre in some cantons.

Petrol costs are set to rise in Switzerland. Photo by Erik mclean from Unsplash
Petrol and diesel prices in Austria have hit a record high. Photo by Erik Mclean from Unsplash

On Monday, oil barrels crossed the $92 mark, which will soon result in higher costs at the pump for drivers. Experts expect the prices to continue to rise, with a $100 barrel of oil not out of the question. 

Touring Club Switzerland, the country’s motor authority, registers a current average of CHF1.87 for petrol and CHF1.91 for diesel fuel. 

However, due to rising crude oil costs as well as a variety of other factors, fuel costs are expected to top the 2008 highs of CHF1.99 for petrol and CHF2.27 for diesel. 

EXPLAINED: How does roadside assistance work in Switzerland?

Worldwide increases in inflation, the impact of the Covid pandemic, a slowdown in American oil production and geopolitical tensions have all contributed to the rise in prices. 

OPEC has agreed to increase production, however this is not expected to satisfy these concerns. 

There is likely to be little respite for cross-border workers or shoppers however, with Swiss fuel prices tending to be lower than those in the surrounding countries. 

This is primarily due to lower tax on fuel sold in Switzerland.

Can you save money on petrol in Switzerland, and if so, how?

Petrol distributors and stations compete with each other, which is good news for consumers.

RTS public broadcaster analysed petrol prices at various stations in several regions and found lowest prices at Rasthof Platenenhof station in Gampelen (BE).

READ MORE: Where in Switzerland can you find the cheapest fuel?

Another cheap fuelling option is a few kilometres away, at the Pit-Stop de Boudevilliers in Val-de-Ruz in canton Neuchâtel.

In fact, RTS reported that this whole region benefits from cheaper gasoline due to its proximity to the Cressier-Cornaux refinery and large volume of purchases.

Another low-cost location is in Samnaun, canton Graubünden in the region of Engiadina Bassa / Val Müstair.

The price there is 30 percent cheaper than on the notoriously expensive Lake Geneva region.

The reason for this price disparity is that this community of just over 700 inhabitants is a historic fiscal enclave that does not apply VAT or other taxes.

Other options include EK Automobile in Kestenholz, Solothurn and Tankstelle Fiechter in Teufenthal, Aargau.

But what if you don’t live in these areas?

You can still save some money on petrol if you do your research and know where the best (meaning: cheapest) places are to fuel up in your region.

Here are some tips:

Autoclub memberships often offer discounts on petrol. ACS members and TCS members can save between two and five cents per litre. 

Larger petrol retailers will also often have discount deals, while Swiss supermarkets also offer deals with particular gas station chains. 

Prices are usually the highest on (or close to) motorways, in or near large cities, and at branded chain stations. You can find better deals at smaller, independent stations away from main roads.

However, you should avoid going too far out of your way to save on fuel.  

“A one-cent difference on the price of the litre justifies a detour of  two to three kilometers, at most. Otherwise, the excess consumption drowns the economy on a 50-litre tank”, said TCS’s Erich Schwizer.

One useful website listing cheaper petrol options throughout Switzerland is this.

READ MORE: How can you save on your household energy bills in Switzerland

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.
For members

COST OF LIVING

Cost of living: How you can beat Switzerland’s inflation blues?

With inflation, and consequently the cost of living, continuing to rise, many consumers find it necessary to spend less than they used to. But is it possible to cut the cost of living in an expensive country like Switzerland?

Cost of living: How you can beat Switzerland's inflation blues?

In April, Switzerland’s inflation rate stood at about 2.6 percent, but it climbed to 3.4 percent in June.

That’s a significant increase, but the good news (at least for the Swiss) is that this rate is still lower than in many other countries in Europe, where it hovers around 8.6 percent.

Nevertheless, Swiss consumers have noticed that their already high cost of living is climbing upwards in line with increasing inflation, and many commonly used products and services have become even more expensive in the past months.

READ MORE: Seven products that are becoming more expensive in Switzerland

It is, however, possible to cut the cost of living somewhat and save money in the process.

Switzerland’s Blick newspaper asked a consumer expert to offer some common-sense tips to help households in Switzerland get more bang out of their franc in these inflationary times.

These are some areas where costs can be cut:

Insurance

According to Sara Stalder, director of the Foundation for Consumer Protection, “it is worth examining your insurance portfolio”, to see where savings could be made.

As health insurance premiums are among the highest expenditures of a typical household, switching to another carrier could cost you less.

You won’t be able to switch until January 2023 (notifying your insurance company of the change by November 30th), but if you do your research now, you’ll be able to save as much as several hundred francs in annual premiums per person in the new year.

READ MORE: Why Swiss patients pay too much for healthcare

Calling and internet

While the costs of telecommunications (internet, mobile phones) have not risen significantly in Switzerland, Stalder advises to seek out “interesting offers that are only available to new customers.”

Also, since streaming services could become more expensive in the near future in the aftermath of the May 15th referendum, this may be a good time to examine whether some platforms you subscribe to (Netflix, Apple TV, Amazon Prime, etc.) should be cancelled.

Weeding out your streaming platforms will cut costs. Photo by freestocks on Unsplash

Credit cards

As The Local reported on July 4th, there are significant differences in annual costs of credit cards, and you can save quite a bit by switching from one card to another.

A recent study by an independent online comparison service Moneyland showed that “occasional users could save 560 francs and frequent users could see savings of more than 830 francs in the first two years if they were to switch to cheapest cards”.

You can find out more about credit card savings here:

Huge differences’: How you can save money on Swiss credit cards

Buy seasonal products

We have gotten used to having a variety of fruits and vegetables available all year round, but this convenience comes at a price.

Fruits and vegetables that are not in season in Switzerland right now (for instance, strawberries and grapes) are imported and therefore more expensive than local produce.

However, many grocery shops have special promotions on fruits that are in season in Switzerland right now, so this staying away from imports could be another way to save money.

And while you are shopping… avoid prepared foods

Sure, it’s easier to pick up a bag of grated carrots than buying them in bulk and grating them yourself, but the price difference could add up if you are used to buying ready-to-eat ,pre-packaged food rather than preparing it yourself.

This may require a change in habits but could also save money in the long-term.

A money-saving move. Image by DaModernDaVinci from Pixabay 

This may be a no-brainer but we have to say it anyway: save on energy!

Energy prices have skyrocketed since Russia invaded Ukraine in February 2022 and are expected to soar further.

READ MORE: Switzerland faces 20 percent increase in electricity costs

As these costs constitute a major expenditure in a household budget, reducing your energy costs is essential, especially if you are a home or apartment owner and have to pay these charges yourself.

These are some ways to reduce your energy consumption, according to a consumer site bonus.ch:

  • Use heat in moderation, setting the temperature according to the size of the room and how often it is being used. Unoccupied rooms should not be heated at all.
  • Turn off the light when leaving a room (this advice is logical and reasonable, and yet many people neglect to do so).
  •  Shut down electrical appliances such as TV and computers completely when not in use, or even unplug them altogether.
  • Use appliances with the energy label “A”, LED lamps and energy-saving bulbs, avoiding devices with high energy consumption, such as aquariums and fans.

SHOW COMMENTS