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Swiss Post unveils ‘scratch and sniff’ stamps which smell like campfires

In celebration of Swiss scouts, Switzerland has unveiled a commemorative postage stamp, which smells like a campfire.

Switzerland's four commemorative stamps, including one which smells like a campfire. Image: Swiss Post
Switzerland's four commemorative stamps, including one which smells like a campfire. Image: Swiss Post

The campfire scent is released when the stamp is rubbed or scratched. 

The stamps were released on Friday, May 5th and will be available only for a limited time. 

They have been issued to commemorate the Swiss Scout Movement, a meeting of around 30,000 scouts which is set to take place in the district of Goms, Valais. 

The Movement only takes place every 14 years. 

Scratch and Sniff: The commemorative campfire stamp. Image: Swiss Post

Scratch and Sniff: The commemorative campfire stamp. Image: Swiss Post

The scouts will set up a tent city in Goms, living there from July 23rd until August 6th. 

The stamps have been released alongside three others which commemorate Swiss traditions and icons. 

One stamp features Switzerland’s William Tell along with a boy, an apple and a crossbow. 

Another celebrates Switzerland’s national parks, while the fourth features an array of Swiss flags on a red background celebrating Swiss national day on August 1st. 

The stamps are available here. 

READ MORE: Austria Post produces ‘three-ply toilet paper stamps’ to promote social distancing 

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FOOD & DRINK

Swiss restaurant fines customers who don’t finish food

A restaurant in the Swiss canton of Aargau has started fining people for not finishing their food, although the motive isn't purely profiteering.

Swiss restaurant fines customers who don't finish food

“Casanova” Indian restaurant in the town of Baden, Aargau, charges a ‘fine’ of five francs — in addition to the bill — to customers who leave food on their plate.

The reason for doing so however is not a typical example of Swiss profiteering – and only applies to those who choose the all-you-can-eat buffet option. 

The owner, Salman Ghauri, grew up in India where a large part of the population doesn’t have enough to eat, said he wanted to remind people how good they have it.

Cost of living: How to save on groceries in Switzerland

“Food is precious in India, we don’t throw it away”, Ghauri told Swiss media, encouraging the Swiss to avoid food waste. 

In his restaurant, he serves an all-you-can-eat buffet for 20 francs, but some people pile up more food onto their plates than they can consume, and uneaten food ends up in trash.

This is why Ghauri decided charge a ‘penalty’ of anyone who doesn’t finish the food — a concept he says most of his customers support.

Ghauri, who has lived in Switzerland for 20 years, said the fine might encourage people to think a little more about what they put on their plate. 

“Some people also leave their plate half full and go back to the buffet to try another dish.”

Ghauri said that while the Swiss learn as children to eat what is served on their plates “as adults we tend to leave that aside”. 

“I find our concept good and I fully support it”. 

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