SHARE
COPY LINK
PRESENTED BY HEC PARIS

93 percent of this MBA’s graduates have doubled their salary

If you're working overseas in the corporate world, odds are that past a certain point, you'll find it difficult to progress without an MBA.

93 percent of this MBA's graduates have doubled their salary
Looking for the MBA that nine out of ten graduates would recommend to their peers? Consider HEC Paris. Photo: Supplied

This can seem an overwhelming prospect – there’s a bewildering variety of MBA courses vying for your attention. Furthermore, when and if you decide on a program, they uniformly involve a significant investment – they can cost anywhere between $60-160,000 USD, and that’s before you factor in the time and energy involved for an on-average two year programme. 

You may ask, is such an undertaking really worth it? 

Together with the leading French business school, HEC Paris, we examine the benefits completing an MBA can provide, and discuss whether it may be the right choice for you. 

A popular choice

Whether you are an employer or an employee, MBAs are popular in the corporate world. In April, a survey by the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) showed that 9 out of 10 MBA graduates recommend the qualification to others, citing the motivation it provides, the career flexibility and the ensuing job prospects as benefits. 

Employers are also big fans of MBA graduates. This year, a survey of international employers by the Association of MBAs (AMBA) revealed their attitudes towards graduates. 47 percent of surveyed employers considered themselves ‘Very Favourable’ towards MBA graduates, with another 40% considering themselves as ‘Favourable’.

Further examination of the AMBA survey reveals what exactly employers value about MBA graduates. Qualities identified in graduates, and rated most highly by employers included understanding of management principles, leadership and problem-solving skills. Time-management skills and ability with multiple languages were also considered skills that MBA graduates excelled in – especially those participating in an international programme. 

Going by this data, completing an MBA seems to be a ‘no brainer for those seeking fast career progression. The time, money and energy required to complete the qualification seem a welcome trade for the upskilling provided, and the favorability it has among employers. 

Looking for an MBA program that offers high quality teaching and a global outlook on business? Find out more about what HEC Paris offers

On the move: Undertaking an MBA can open up a world of career opportunities. Photo: Getty Images

Case Study: HEC Paris

For a better idea of how an MBA can benefit those seeking to move their career forward, let us examine one particular cohort from one program – in this case, the graduating class of 2021 from HEC Paris

First, we should identify some important information about the class. 281 participants from 50 different countries made up the 2021 cohort. 34 percent of graduates were female, and 66 percent male. Almost half of the 2021 class hailed from the Asia and Oceania regions, followed by the Americas, Europe and finally, Africa. The average years of work experience prior to embarking on the MBA was six years. The course length for an HEC MBA is 16 months – as opposed to the usual 24. 

Three months after graduating, 93% of the HEC Paris 2021 cohort had accepted a job offer. On average, in accepting those job offers these graduates almost doubled their pre-MBA salaries.

Some of the top recruiters for the 2021 cohort included Amazon, Hello Fresh, Microsoft and Deloitte – all thriving companies with an international reach.  

Of course, a higher salary isn’t everything. Job satisfaction and flexibility also play an important role for many. 79 percent of HEC graduates changed their job sector following graduation and 67 percent changed their role, demonstrating the opportunities provided by the qualification – students were able to find a role that better suited their interests and passions. 

An MBA also led to greater mobility for HEC Paris graduates. 68 percent of the cohort secured a job outside of their home country, beginning an international career and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for many.

93% of 2021 HEC Paris MBA graduates received a new job offer within three months of graduation – find out what set them apart from their peers

Strong connections: HEC Paris students can access an alumni network stretching across both industries and the globe. 

The sensible decision

For those wishing to progress their career, undertaking an MBA would appear to be the smart choice across a number of important metrics. 

Whether it’s an increased salary, greater career flexibility or international mobility, the data demonstrates that the 2021 graduating class of HEC Paris have enjoyed all three. 

Of course, not all MBAs are the same, and many have a particular focus, whether it be industry-specific or more focused on leadership skills. It is important to do your research before making any decision and to talk to alumni to get a better understanding of what you’re about to take on.  

For an MBA program with an international focus and a global reputation for quality teaching, you may like to consider HEC Paris. Based near an international centre of culture and commerce, students enjoy world-class teaching across sixteen months of industry experience, and are able to access a strong alumni network. The school also offers flexibility in terms of learning, with a number of delivery options to suit your schedule. One of Europe’s top three business schools, HEC Paris demonstrates excellence in MBA education. 

Choosing to undertake an MBA is not a decision to be taken lightly – but as we’ve seen, the positives can more than make up for the costs, financial or otherwise. 

Enrol in the HEC Paris MBA that unlocks significant career progression, increased salaries and international mobility for its graduates 

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

SKI

Franco-Swiss cold war breaks out over ski border car park

Switzerland and France are in a snowball fight over a cross-border car park which serves Swiss ski slopes but has been closed by the French due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Franco-Swiss cold war breaks out over ski border car park
The object of the Franco-Swiss war: parking lot Les Dappes. Photo by AFP

The Battle of Dappes Car Park — for the moment a rather cold war — has been rumbling for weeks, triggered by the different Covid-19 rules on either side of an invisible line in a snow-covered field.

The 650-space car park sits in the valley between the pistes of La Dole on the Swiss side, and Les Tuffes in France. It is 250 metres inside French territory.

In the Jura mountains, the summit of La Dole overlooks Lake Geneva in the west of Switzerland — a country which has kept ski slopes open despite the pandemic, while neighbouring France has closed theirs.

So the chair lifts for La Dole sit empty — because nobody can use the shared car park in France.

“I cannot understand how the French authorities can decide that the Swiss cannot go skiing in their own country. This is a unilateral decision,” fumed Gerard Produit, tourism chief in Switzerland's Nyon region.

“We are being held hostage by the politics of both countries,” he told AFP, deploring the “legal imbroglio”.

The frozen chair lifts are an unwelcome sight for Patrick Freudiger, the boss of the Tele-Dole ski lifts company.

“In mid-December, we organised a meeting between France and Switzerland to present the Covid plan” for La Dole, Freudiger told AFP.

But since the end of December, “we have received three successive orders banning the use of the car park” — the latest one being valid until February 3.

READ MORE: Large crowds on Swiss ski slopes spark concern over coronavirus spread

'They won't listen' 

The prefecture of the Jura local authority in France told AFP the car park is “likely to encourage the gathering of more than six people in a public space in France, the mixing of groups, and therefore the circulation of the virus”.

The wider Bourgogne-Franche-Comte region has the highest intensive care bed occupancy rate in France, while the Jura local authority area has one of the highest Covid-19 incidence rates in the country.

Freudiger is fuming that the French authorities did not try to reach an agreement on access to the car park.

Rubbing salt into the wounds, the site was refurbished last year thanks to Swiss investment, as part of a project to create a cross-border ski destination.

Freudiger also voiced surprise that the car park is shut while car-pooling car parks for French inhabitants who work in Switzerland remain open.

“We tried to get in touch with the prefect; we could not reach him. They do not hear us, they won't even listen to us,” said Produit.

See you in court 

Tele-Dole filed two appeals last Friday to the Besancon administrative court in France over the situation. A hearing is scheduled to take place next Monday.

Switzerland's Nyon region wrote to the Jura authorities on Thursday requesting talks “as soon as possible” on potential solutions and “financial compensation” for Tele-Dole.

According to Freudiger, the ski lifts have already lost 40 working days — almost half the season — and 300,000 Swiss francs (€280,000).

Tele-Dole cannot claim any financial assistance from the Swiss government, because there is nothing to stop ski stations remaining open during the pandemic.

Etienne Bovard, director of La Dole's Swiss Ski School, faces the same headache. The school has around 20 instructors but has had to stop all group lessons.

“In terms of turnover, we are 20 percent down at the moment, and if this continues throughout February… it will amount to an 85 percent loss,” he said.

“What's terrible is that it's the children,” who make up 80 percent of the clientele, “who are victims of this political game”.
 

SHOW COMMENTS