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CYCLING

Tour de Romandie stage shortened due to snow

Switzerland's Stefan Kung battled wintry conditions to claim Thursday's shortened second stage of the Tour de Romandie as Italian Fabio Felline remained in the lead.

Tour de Romandie stage shortened due to snow
Stefan Kung wins the stage. Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP
The BMC rider Kung beat Ukrainian Andrey Grivko in a sprint finish to win stage two of the race for the second time in three years.
    
Kung and Grivko finished just ahead of the chasing peloton after the pair were the two lone survivors of a four-man breakaway that held a six-minute lead at one point.
   
Originally due to begin in Champery and cover just over 160km, the stage instead began in Aigle and was reduced to 136.5km with a potentially treacherous descent removed due to chilly temperatures and “light snowfall”.
   
Felline, who won Tuesday's prologue, stayed eight seconds clear of German Maximilian Schachmann and Jesus Herrada of Spain.
   
Twice former champion Chris Froome is 36th but only 29 seconds off the lead ahead of Friday's flat 187km stage around Payerne in western Switzerland.
   
The race ends in Lausanne on Sunday with an 18.3km individual time-trial.
 

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CYCLING

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021

Demand for bicycles has soared in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic, but conversely the global supply is at record low levels, with consumers having to wait months or over a year for their bike of choice.

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021
Photo: Stocksnap/Pixabay

Bikes are projected to outsell cars in Europe by two to one by 2030.   

But 2021 will not be an easy year to buy a bike in many European countries, especially if you have a particular model in mind. 

Firstly, there's been a huge surge in demand for bikes during the pandemic, as Europeans looked for ways to stay fit and move around more freely without having to worry about being exposed to Covid-19 on public transport.

On the flip side, bike production in China, which supplies almost the entire global market, has practically ground to a halt.

The same can be said for bicycle accessories and components, which are either not being produced in Chinese factories currently or held up for months in ports in Asia due to the reduction of capacity in shipping.

 

In this short report, video producer Alex Dunham explores the issue of Europe's bike shortage in 2021.

 

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