Today in Switzerland For Members

Today in Switzerland: A roundup of the latest news on Thursday

Helena Bachmann in Geneva
Helena Bachmann in Geneva - [email protected] • 17 Nov, 2022 Updated Thu 17 Nov 2022 08:11 CEST
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This fondue is now a protected cheese dish. Image by M W from Pixabay

Restaurants and cafés are set to raise their prices, government defines temperature limits for this winter, and other Swiss news in our roundup on Thursday.

Eating out is also set to become more expensive

Two-thirds of restaurants and cafés in Switzerland are likely to raise prices over the next three months to offset inflation.

This is the finding of a new a survey by KOF Economic Research Center.

“It is an economic necessity. Without a significant price increase, most cafés and restaurants would lose money,” according to Maurus Ebneter, president of the Basel restaurant association.

Prices will likely increase by 5 to 10 percent, which means, for instance, that a cup of coffee would cost 30 to 40 cents more than it does currently.

READ MORE: How does the cost of living crisis in Switzerland compare to other countries?

 'Half and half' fondue is protected by a trademark

Anyone who has ever eaten a fondue in Switzerland knows that one of the most popular versions of this Swiss dish is ‘half and half’ kind, so called because it is made from 50 percent Vacherin fribourgeois and 50 percent Gruyère cheeses.

Both are carrying the AOP label (Appellation d’Origine Protégée in French), which means the products are entirely made in their region of origin and meet strict criteria.

This product is now protected because of the “ever more frequent use of the melted denomination ‘half and half’ for products which do not use the two AOP cheeses,” the associations of the two cheese manufacturers said in a joint statement on Wednesday.  

READ MORE: ‘Fondue is Swiss… the French just don’t know how to make it’
 

Fewer Croatians  will be allowed to work in Switzerland in 2023

For 2022, the federal government earmarked 178 residence permits for Croat nationals, but by the end of October 2,413 B permits had been issued.

“The number of workers from Croatia has risen sharply this year and now exceeds the threshold figure defined in the Agreement on the Free Movement of Persons," the government announced on Thursday.

“The Federal Council therefore decided to invoke the safeguard clause provided for by the Agreement."

This clause allows Switzerland to unilaterally reintroduce quotas if immigration from Croatia exceeds a certain threshold  — as it has this year.

READ MORE: Swiss to allow ‘complete’ free movement of people from Croatia

Government defines temperature rule in case of energy shortage

If a serious gas shortage were to arise, the temperature inside buildings heated with natural gas could be limited to 20°C, the Federal Council said in a statement on Wednesday.

Initial recommendations the government issued in September called for the temperature to be set at 19°C, but it is now upped by 1 degree.

Speaking a press conference in Bern, Economy Minister Guy Parmelin stressed, however, that the population should not be alarmed, as  “the risk of a gas shortage during the winter of 2022-2023 is rather low”.

Lausanne Chrtistmas market opens today

The first holiday fair among Switzerland's largest cities opens today in the Vaud capital.

The markets will be located throughout the city rather than in one central location:

  • Place Saint-François
  • Place Pépine
  • Arches du Grand-pont et place de l’Europe
  • Terrasse Jean-Monnet
  • Place Centrale
  • Esplanade de la Cathédrale
  • Esplanade du Flon

READ MORE: Which Swiss Christmas markets are opening in November?

If you have any questions about life in Switzerland, ideas for articles or news tips for The Local, please get in touch with us at [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Helena Bachmann in Geneva 2022/11/17 08:11

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